Monday, 18 January 2010

A View From the Road - Landscape Features at High-Speed


To continue on the topic of ‘a view from the Road’ another high-speed clip documenting a road trip. Here with 800mph from North Point Hong Kong Island to Mui Wo on Lantau Island. Very interesting how the features of the urban development direct the experience of the trip.
Some examples I picked out to illustrated the idea Lynch used to characterise and describe the urban experience as seen from the road in his book ‘The view From the Road’ (1966). I have increased the contrast on those key images to highlight the landscape feature. One should spend a bit more time on this to do it properly, was just a quick sketch.

ViewFTRoad_Hong-Kong01.Vyl37c5mnibM.jpg
Image by urbanTick / screenshots taken from the clip by LantauOnline / The increased contrast highlights the landscape features.

8 comments:

nick said...

Love what you've done with my video and glad that it led me to discover your blog - great work.

fan said...

Thanks for your response. Sorry I have to apologies, didn't send a notice. Glad you like it.

Garden Beet said...

thanks was after lynch's book as a reference for an article - great read - so what are you going to do with the information you have collected?

fan said...

garden beet - interested to hear about your article. how does lynch and garden fit? What material are you talking about, not sure what you mean.

Anonymous said...

hi - - i have written two articles on roadscaping in the UK - here are the links

http://gardenbeet.wordpress.com/2010/03/19/pothole-gardens-check-out-this-great-design-approach-uk-highways-agency/

and

http://gardenbeet.wordpress.com/2009/09/13/landscapes-in-the-se-of-england/

Garden Beet said...

opps that was me above !! garden beet

Anonymous said...

i am a student of architecture and doing my thesis on space-time compression. When speed increases, space as well as time shrinks therefore the experiential quality of space changes. The experiences of space and time have imploded and become fused by speed, as a consequence of this implosion we are witnessing a distinct reversal of the two dimensions, a temporalisation of space and spatialisation of time. When we travel at speed the streetscape and landscape pass by and we tend to ignore it. The perception of this streetscape depends on the speed of the moving observer. In today’s world the architecture in an urban context is becoming obsolete in relation to the moving viewer at speed. Therefore there is a need to bridge this gap between architecture and the viewer moving at speed. When the observer speed is fast the perceived details are the mass of the objects. (blurry vision effect)
All this led me to think perhaps a revised architectural language may reflect the current condition of travel in the city.
need some more ideas as to what i can do to make this thesis really interesting. any ideas of possible projects that i can do?

fan said...

Surely speed does influence the perception, we can all agree on this. However I am not convinced with what you are saying about the blurring effect and especially that architecture disappears. Have another look at Appelyard-Lynch's book. They show in detail how different elements do intact very much stand out and define the perception. Similar in the book Alison Smithson (from Peter and Alison) AS in DS the very same thing is discussed. It not only depends on speed, but also distance and perspective.