Tuesday, 2 February 2010

Green Police - the Power of Recycling

The topic of climate change is currently one of the top topics. However the acceptance of facts of a human involvement are only slowly settling. One of the earliest observations of the environmental temperature rise was undertaken by Charles David Keeling at the Mauna Loa Observatory. He has produced the most striking graph used in the debate from early on.

Image taken from Scripps Institution Of Oceanography / The Keeling Curve

The latest development in the global debate has climaxed in the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP15 held at the end of 2009 in Denmark. There were no real conclusions or immediate actions to the problem at hand. However, the fact that climate change is accepted as a global issue is already something.
Besides the important politicians talking, isn’t there something everyone can do? The buzz word here probably is sustainability, a term that is fluid and employable by too man different interests. It has become a empty phrase. Individual responsibility and action is probably the more powerful alternative, quite likely the only alternative there is. Greenpeace has published a starting guide HERE.
As a wider community based project the Green Police is an effort to tackle sustainability on an everyday level. The wiki states: ‘The modern Green Police are an environmental task force comprised of collaborative law enforcement groups assembled to crack down on emissions’ Details on the Green Police can be found on wikiAnswers, a great place for all sorts of questions. It is not at all a dull cooperation. The Green Police is for example active at festivals such as Glastonbury. So you have the possibility to combine a great festival and some work for the environment. You can sign up HERE to take part as a Green Police Officer at the upcoming Glastonbury festival 2010.

Image taken from musicGreen / Green Police can be a lot of fun

Found through musicGreen


Waste Collection said...

Great post! When I read your article, I really agree with you about this. I hope you will share more with us. Thank you!

Dan polymer said...

Great post, cant believe the amount of rubbish that has been left behind.